While certainly the most dramatic find, the ship burial at what is known as Mound One is just one of 18 burial mounds at the site. There are two Sutton Hoo Helmets in Room 41, the original and a replica showing how the original previously looked. If you subscribe to BBC History Magazine Print or Digital Editions then you can unlock 10 years’ worth of archived history material fully searchable by Topic, Location, Period and Person. The objects are comprised of multiple bronze, gold and silver objects of Anglo Saxon origin, found in Suffolk, England, including: a helmet, sceptre, sword, hanging bowl, bowls and spoons, shoulder clasps, a belt buckle, and purse lid. Up Next. Sutton Hoo: a brief guide to the Anglo-Saxon burial site and its discovery. He may have converted to the new religion, as all his successors were Christian. This is one of the standard texts on Sutton Hoo written by the archaeologist who undertook the last major excavation of the site. The objects found at these and the neighbouring mounds have proven vital in our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon inhabitants of sixth- and seventh-century-AD East Anglia. Carry on browsing if you're happy with this, or find out how to manage cookies. Purse lid from the Sutton Hoo ship burial . The burial shows us that this corner of Suffolk was extraordinarily well connected to the world around it. It is a huge, four-sided whetstone, skilfully carved from a hard, … Sadly, because of the acidic nature of the soils at Sutton Hoo, no trace of the body at the centre of the grave survived and, in the absence of an inscription or other historical reference, the identity of the person interred will probably never be known for sure. The movie, titled The Dig, stars Ralph Fiennes, Carey Mulligan and Lily James and revolves around the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial in 1939 in Suffolk. The King's Mound treasure is displayed in Room 41: Sutton Hoo and Europe, AD 300-1100 at The British Museum, London, where it can be seen in the context of the seismic changes taking place across Europe in the Early Medieval period. This site is best known for the Anglo-Saxon burial mounds that were discovered during the first half of the 20th century, including a magnificent ship burial, which is popularly believed to have belonged to an Anglo-Saxon king. Sutton Hoo can claim to be Britain’s very own Valley of the Kings. Purse lid from the Sutton Hoo ship burial Wealth, and its public display, was probably used to establish status in early Anglo-Saxon society much as it is today. The Sutton Hoo purse lid. The site consists of 19 or 20 burial mounds that were most likely formed between 625 and 670 AD. The origin of the term 'Viking' is uncertain, perhaps coming from Old Norse words for pirates, seaborne expeditions, or an area in south-eastern Norway called Viken. Discovered in 1939, it is one of the largest and best-preserved archaeological finds of the Saxon period in Europe . Practice: Sutton Hoo ship burial (quiz) Fibulae. Here, the ship became the last resting place of a king or a great warrior. The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial: A General Background and Source List. it is believed to have been the helmet of King Raedwald; for whom its elaborate decoration may have given it … While the majority of Sutton Hoo’s treasures are housed at the British Museum, the site itself is certainly well worth visiting. The objects are comprised of multiple bronze, gold and silver objects of Anglo Saxon origin, found in Suffolk, England, including: a helmet, sceptre, sword, hanging bowl, bowls and spoons, shoulder clasps, a belt buckle, and purse lid. Around the body were the most personal treasures. The helmet has become a symbol of the Sutton Hoo burial; yet it survived as a mass of small pieces, and was only reconstructed after years of painstaking work in the British Museum Laboratory. It is one of the most famous archaeological finds in the world, a status stemming from the high-status grave-goods excavated from the site and now displayed in the British Museum. Practice: Fibulae (quiz) Next lesson. The first trailer for Netflix blockbuster movie The Dig, a drama based on the discovery of the Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk, has been released. It is very important to historians because it tells them a great deal about the wealth and traditions of early Anglo-Saxon kings. Sutton Hoo: a brief guide to the Anglo-Saxon burial site and its discovery Save over 50% on a BBC History Magazine or BBC History Revealed gift subscription The two Anglo-Saxon cemeteries, from the 6th and 7th centuries, were an extraordinary find, with one of the highlights being an undisturbed ship burial. The lesser known ship burial took place in Mound Two. It was made of oak and after 1,300 years in the acidic soil, it rotted away leaving only its 'ghost' imprinted in the sand. Inside the burial mound was the imprint of a decayed ship and a central chamber filled with treasures. Much of these artifacts can today be found in the British Museum in London. •    The Royal Burial Ground is a Scheduled Monument, •    Grave robbers tried to rob the King's Mound, but missed the treasure by just a couple of metres, •    Edith's son, Robert, left his roller-skates in the other ship burial back in 1938. This is about the Anglo-Saxon ship burial under Mound One at Sutton Hoo, in Suffolk England. Autumn at Sutton Hoo Join us this autumn for golden leaves in the woodlands, crisp sunshine and the magic of the Royal Burial Ground in the mist. Thank you for subscribing to HistoryExtra, you now have unlimited access. The burial goods from Sutton Hoo are remarkable - gold weapons and armour, inlaid ornaments, silver and tableware. However, the nature of the finds, which predominantly date from the early 7th century, have led some archaeologists and historians to suggest that this may have been the final resting place of a king, most probably Raedwald, ruler of the East Angles, who died sometime around AD 624. Sutton Hoo is an archaeological site located near the town of Woodbridge, in Suffolk, East Anglia, England. One of the items discovered in a burial chamber was an entire ship and its contents. Founded about 600 C.E., and lasting a hundred years, Sutton Hoo contained only about twenty burials, most of them rich and unusual, spread over four hectares. At the centre of the chamber was presumably the body – though as the soil was so acid, it had not survived. The silver dish was made in Byzantium c500. View of the burial mounds at dawn at Sutton Hoo, A Short Guide to the Royal Burial Ground at Sutton Hoo. Also found within the ship was a purse containing 37 gold Merovingian (Gaulish) gold coins dating from the 620s. Sutton Hoo, estate near Woodbridge, Suffolk, England, that is the site of an early medieval burial ground that includes the grave or cenotaph of an Anglo-Saxon king. Introduction: Sutton Hoo. 1,400 years ago, a king or great warrior of East Anglia was laid to rest in a 90ft ship, surrounded by his extraordinary treasures. The internment of a ship at Sutton Hoo represents the most impressive medieval grave to be discovered in Europe. Sutton Hoo Ship Burial, c. 700 (British Museum, London) Multiple bronze, gold and silver objects of Anglo Saxon origin, found in Suffolk, England, including: a helmet, sceptre, sword, hanging bowl, bowls and spoons, shoulder clasps, a belt buckle, and purse lid. Episodes in poems such as Beowulf now have tangible, archaeolog ical evidence to add creditability to the often strange blend of customs presented in the text. It was the grave goods within the burial chamber that drew the most attention. Sutton Hoo ship burial. Sutton Hoo ship burial: 7th century: East Anglia, in which Sutton Hoo lies, is the kingdom of the East Angles. While the most celebrated find is an intricate ceremonial helmet, there are also pieces made of gold and embellished with gems, many of which are considered to be the best quality found in Europe from that period. And all this is set within a beautiful 255-acre estate, offering walks with incredible views, and even an Edwardian house to explore should the weather take an inclement turn. copyright 2000. She gave them all to the all to the nation and they can still be seen and enjoyed today at the British Museum. You can unsubscribe at any time. Mound Two was reconstructed to its original height back in 1992 as an experiment to see how fast a mound would erode. Simply fold the printed pages in half to create the booklet. Please check with the British Museum to find out when they're open for a visit. Who then was buried in the boat at Sutton Hoo? Although all physical trace has gone, perhaps the ship has sailed on into the next world, bearing its captain on new adventures. Edith Pretty generously donated the finds to the museum in 1939, and those on view include the iconic helmet, a giant copy of which adorns the front of the visitor centre at Sutton Hoo. The official website for BBC History Magazine, BBC History Revealed and BBC World Histories Magazine, Save over 50% on a BBC History Magazine or BBC History Revealed gift subscription, The two Anglo-Saxon cemeteries, from the 6th and 7th centuries, were an extraordinary find, with one of the highlights being an undisturbed ship burial. A few miles from the Suffolk coast, the Sutton Hoo ship burial was one of the most exciting discoveries in British archaeology, and one that profoundly exploded the myth of the 'Dark Ages'. The site of Sutton Hoo is run by the National Trust. Amazon Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" £19.18 . Redwald was the first East Anglian king to pay attention to Christianity. The most likely theory would seem to name the deceased as King Raedwald, an Anglo-Saxon leader who triumphed over Northumberland, but courted controversy when he erected an altar for Jesus Christ alongside one for the ‘old gods’. The burial at Sutton Hoo, like those of confirmed Viking burials, shows a well-developed notion of the afterlife. He covers the history of the site in outline while providing a detailed account of the main excavations that have taken place from discovery … Items that were found included weapons and armor, including the famous Sutton Hoo helmet, objects made of precious metals, as well as equipment used during feasts, such as drinking horns and cauldrons. You can take the opportunity to walk around and explore the burial mounds, as well as check out the large visitor centre, which features permanent and temporary exhibitions. Finds from Mound 17. The items discovered at Sutton Hoo almost certainly date from the 7th century. Who then was buried in the boat at Sutton Hoo? It is designed to be printed double sided (flip on the short edge). Bellow is … Archive footage of the excavation of the Sutton Hoo ship burial in Suffolk, in the east of England in 1939. Here mysterious grassy mounds covered a number of ancient graves. British Museum London, United Kingdom. Dating to the early AD 600s, this outstanding burial site doubtless memorialized a high-status person, perhaps one of the great East-Anglian kings. The centre houses exquisite replicas of many of the most important finds, made using traditional methods, plus a number of original pieces. The 27 metre long Anglo-Saxon ship from Sutton Hoo no longer exists. ( CC BY-SA 2.5 ) These grave goods have also allowe… Please enter your number below. He died in about 616 ce. Sort by: Top Voted. The massive effort that went into Raedwald's burial gives some idea of just how important a man he was, while the elaborate nature of the treasures unearthed transformed perceptions of the era. Sutton Hoo may be the burial site of Redwald, a powerful Saxon king who ruled East Anglia and possibly some areas farther north in the late 500s and early 600s. The most famous of the Sutton Hoo burial-mounds is Mound One, which was excavated in 1939 and found to contain the remains of an undisturbed treasure laden ship, the funerary vessel of an early seventh-century Wuffing king. There are around eighteen burial mounds within the Royal Burial Ground. Sutton Hoo is the site of a group of Anglo-Saxon burial mounds from the 6th and 7th centuries. This unknown figure was buried with his vast treasure, undisturbed until the site was excavated, initially by the landowner, Edith Pretty, in 1939. Everything you ever wanted to know about... proven vital in our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon inhabitants, Castro and the trip that shaped the 1960s, The collapse of Roman Britain: what happened, plus 9 places which tell us more, Alfred the Great and Edington: how the King of Wessex became great, King Arthur: five men who made up the legendary Dark Ages king. Many of the pieces would have been produced by master craftsmen. We have produced a short guide to the Royal Burial Ground you can print out ahead of your visit. The ten silver bowls found beside the body-space most commonly identified as the burial or cenotaph of the East Anglian king Rædwald (d. 624-5; see Bruce-Mitford 1974: 33), appear somewhat obscurely at first in Rupert Bruce-Mitford's popular British Museum handbook to the Sutton Hoo ship burial: Three feet out from the west wall a dome-like lump, with purplish stains, proved to be a nest of eight inverted silver bowls, one inside t… In one particular grave, belonging to an important Anglo-Saxon warrior, some astonishing objects were buried, but there is little in the grave to make it clear who was buried there. The Sutton Hoo ship burial. The Sutton Hoo burial ground in East Anglia, England, provides vivid evidence for attitudes to death immediately before the conversion of an English community to Christianity in the seventh century C.E. A small display of archival material relating to Sutton Hoo is now on display in Room 2, until September 2019, to commemorate the 80th anniversary of its discovery. Sutton Hoo ship burial . The discovery revolutionised our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon period and provided a lens through which to examine this fascinating era of history. Sutton Hoo shows a fascinating mix of Christian and pagan traditions that have done much to shed light on passages from Anglo-Saxon poetry dealing with the burial process. By entering your details, you are agreeing to HistoryExtra terms and conditions and privacy policy. Away from Suffolk, the British Museum in London houses many of the treasures in a dedicated gallery. The mixture of influences on these Germanic occupants of what was once Roman Britain is … The site was excavated in the 1930s and it has revealed some incredibly important finds and helped to further our knowledge of the Anglo-Saxons in Britain. Most have long since been plundered by grave robbers, but the tomb uncovered at Mound Seventeen was another hugely significant find, revealing a young warrior and his horse, buried complete with not just his weapons but also everyday items such as cooking tools and a comb. Many of the original finds and a full-scale reconstruction of his ship and burial chamber can be seen in the visitor centre. Comparisons have been drawn between Sutton Hoo and sites in Sweden, while many point to links between the spot and the epic poem Beowulf, which opens with the ship burial of a king. In 1939, Sutton Hoo resident Edith Pretty commissioned a local amateur archaeologist to explore several Anglo Saxon burial mounds on her property. There seems to be a problem, please try again. Alex Burghart looks back to the discovery of the fabulous Anglo-Saxon burial at Sutton Hoo, and ponders how far we've come in our knowledge of the period since 1939 October 29, 2020 at 12:05 pm The year 1939 saw a rare a ray of light shine into the Dark Ages, and made people realise that the Anglo-Saxon period did not deserve that gloomy moniker. There is an ornate gold belt buckle, a decorated sword and its scabbard, buckles and clasps from clothing and a purse containing gold coins. Find out more about visiting Sutton Hoo, managed by the National Trust. There are three Anglo-Saxon ship burials known to archaeology in England - one up the road at a place called Snape, and two at Sutton Hoo. The first trailer for Netflix blockbuster movie The Dig, a drama based on the discovery of the Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk, has been released. One of the mounds, excavated in 1939, revealed the remains of a 90-foot long wooden ship. Pretty called upon the services of a self-taught archaeologist, Basil Brown, who made the discovery. This curious object is one of the most extraordinary objects to survive from the Anglo-Saxon period. Sutton Hoo ship burial. You have successfully linked your account! This information first appeared in BBC History Revealed magazine, Save over 50% on a gift subscription to their favourite history magazine. Underneath the Hourseman's Mound lay a double burial: a young warrior and his horse. The discovery revolutionised our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon period and provided a lens through which to examine this fascinating era of history. Buried around 625 AD. The Royal Burial Ground at Sutton Hoo Explore the atmospheric seventh-century Royal Burial Ground as you discover the history and mystery of what lay beneath the earth. There’s also a full-size reconstruction of the burial chamber, which brings home the scale of the find. 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